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The importance of listening - Курсова робота


Курсова робота
The importance of listening
Plan
I. Introduction.
II. The main part:
1. Tapescript.
2. Transcription.
3. Exercises.
III. Vocabulary work: synonyms, antonyms, word families.
IV. Conclusion.
The importance of listening
Begin by establishing the importance of listening:
- We cannot develop speaking skills unless we also develop listening skills; to have a successful conversation. Students must understand what is said to them. Later, the ability to understand spoken English may become very important (for listening to the radio, understanding foreign visitors, studying, etc.). To develop this ability, students need plenty of practice in listening to English spoken at normal speed.
- Listening to spoken English is an important way of acquiring the language - of 'picking up' structures and vocabulary. In a situation where learners are living in a country where English is the first language, they plenty of 'exposure' to the language - they hear it all the time, and can acquire it more easily than learners who do not hear English spoken around them. So it need to give these learners as much apportunity to listen to spoken English as possible.
In class, we are usually concerned with 'Focussed' listening: we listen for a particular purpose, to find out information we need to know. Examples of this kind of listening are: listening to a piece of important news on the radio; listening to someone explaining how to operate a machine. In these situations, we listen much more closely; but we do not listen to everything we hear with equal concentration - we listen for the most important points or for particular information. Usually, we know beforehand what we are listening for (the things we want to know), and this helps us to listen.
The debate about the use of authentic listening material is just as fierce in listening material is just as fierce in listening as it is in reading. If, for example, we play a tape of a political speech to complete beginners, they won't understand a word. You could argue that such a tape would at least give them a feel for the sound of the language, but beyond that it is difficult to see what they would get out of it. If, on the other hand, we give them a realistic (though not authentic) tape of a telephone conversation, they may learn much more about the language - and start to gain confidence as a result.
Everything depends on level, and the kind of tasks that go with a tape. There may well be some authentic material which is usable by beginners such as pre-recorded announcements, telephone messages etc. More difficult material may be appropriate for elementary students provided that the questions they are asked do not demand detailed understanding. Advanced students may benefit from scripted material provided that it is interesting and subtle enough - and provided the tasks that go with it are appropriate for their level.
Since, as it was said, listening to tapes is a way of bringing different. Kinds of speaking into the classroom, it is wanted to play different kinds of tape to them, e.g. announcements, conversations, telephone exchanges, leetures, interviews, other radio programmes, stories read aloud etc.
Tape programme to corposy indirections to:
A listening speaking skills book. Second adition by Judis Tuka.
Chapter 1. Education and student plays.
Part 1. Phonological clubs. Page 2.
Context: A following conversation between an American teacher and a foreign student takes place on the college campas. This is there first meaning.
Pre-reading questions:
- Where do you think they are going?
- Who will start the conversation?
- What time of year is it?
- Is anything else you would like to know about them?
Getting the main idea.
A. Listen to the conversation. Listen to the main ideas only.
- Excuse me. Could you tell me where Camble Hall is?
- Oh, you mean Camble Hall?
- Yes, that's right.
- It's right to be there. I am going there too. Are you taking an English placement test?
- Yes, I am. How about you?
- I am going to be as an English teacher this year.
- Oh, really? Maybe I will be in your class.
- Gloria Sanchals.
- My name is Linda. Are you from South America?
- Yes, I am from Venesuella.
- Have you been here long?
- I've been here since August.
- Is that all? Your English is grate.
- My family used to come here every summer when I was small. Now I want to go to college here.
- What do you want to study?
- I am interested in business, administration.
- I see. We have to take it awful.
- What?
- The test of English, as a foreign language. It's awful.
- Oh, right. Yes, that's way I came to this school.
- Well, here is Camble Hall. Good luck on a placement exam. Meybe I'll see you in class.
- Thank's. I hope so.
B. Diskuss the entrance to the pre-reading questions. When your predications correct? What do you remember about Gloria and Linda.
Stress.
C. In spoken English important words - words that carry information, are usually stressed. This means they are high piched, louder, pronounced more clearly.
Listen to the conversation again and fill in the missing stressed words.
- Exuse me. Could you tell me where Camble Hall is?
- Oh, you mean Camble Hall?
- Yes, that's tight.
- It's right to be there. I am going there too. Are you taking an English placement test?
- Yes, I am. How about you?
- I am going as English teacher this year.
- Oh really. Maybe I'll be in your class.
- It's possible. What's your name?
- Gloria Sanchals.
- My name is Linda. Are you from South America?
- Yes, I'm from Venesuella.
- Have you been here long?
- I've been here since August.
- Is that all? Your English is grate.
My family used to come here every summer when I was small. Now I want to go to college here.
- What do you want to study?
- I'm interested in business administration.
- I see we are have to take it awful.
- What?
- The test of English as a foreign language, It's awful.
- Oh, right. Yes, that's way I came to this school.
- Well, here is Camble Hall. Good luck on a placement exam. Meybe I'll see you in class.
- Thank's. I hope so.
D. Now listen again, repeat it sedness after the speaker. Remember, stressed words are louder and clearer than unstressed words.
Redactions.
E. In spoken English the words that are not stressed are often shoten or redused. For example:
"Could you tell me where Cabme Hall is" changes to could you tell me where Cambe Hall is. Listen to the deggerense: long - could you
short - could you
There are several examples of redused in the conversation you'd just heart. Listen to theseexamples of long and short forms and repeat the short form after the speaker:
- Oh, you mean Camble Hall?
- How about you?
- I'm going to be as English teacher this year.
- What's your name?
- My family used to come here every summer.
- Now I want to go to college here.
- Would you have to take that awful?
F. Listen to the redaction in the following conversation between a
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